Tag Archives: youth

High School students educate and express through comics

I read a really interesting post today about how students at Oakland International High School (enrollment 300) are gaining publicity for their annual publication of graphic novels/comics depicting and describing their immigration stories.  Teacher Thi Bui has been having her ninth and tenth grade students–mostly API youth–write and illustrate their personal and family experiences in immigrating to the United States.  These get published, and Bui even sells some of her own works.  It’s a great article that can be found here.

Reading about how youth in the community are being empowered by this process of artistic expression is inspiring.  The healing that takes place throughout their personal journeys in documenting their experiences has helped many students already.  Think of what this would do if more schools adopted such methods for immigrant or multicultural youth: we would not only be giving voice to our communities but also educating others about real experiences and new perspectives.  Great stuff that truly makes the personal political.

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Jillian Toda is an Oregonian from the Columbia River Gorge, where her great grandparents farmed upon arriving to America from Japan.   She is currently a student at Willamette University majoring in Rhetoric and Media Studies, with a minor in American Ethnic Studies.  In her spare time, she’s an MBA candidate at Atkinson Graduate School of Management.

What is being APIA?

A post in Angry Asian Man yesterday touched on issues previously and currently affecting the APIA community.  While Phil Yu is on vacation, he enlisted California Assemblymember, Warren Furutani, to write a guest post.

Furutani’s article nicely synthesizes and summarizes the emergence of the APIA identity, and how we should move toward the future having had those past experiences.  He also proposes that APIA’s should look for ways to include other/all groups in our solidarity.  The piece is empowering and can be summed up by its great last lines:

How do we define Asian and Pacific Islander America? It is dynamic and ever changing based upon our collective changing American experience. We can define it any way we want.

Read the whole entry here.

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Jillian Toda is an Oregonian from the Columbia River Gorge, where her great grandparents farmed upon arriving to America from Japan.   She is currently a student at Willamette University earning a B.A. in Rhetoric and Media Studies, with a minor in American Ethnic Studies, while also working toward an M.B.A. at Atkinson Graduate School of Management in Salem, OR.   New to blogging, Jillian’s personal blog can be found at http://reality-plus-me.blogspot.com/

HIV and APIA women

Some really interesting research has been conducted by Dr. Hyeouk Chris Hahm, a professor at Boston University.  She is the lead investigator of the API Women’s Sexual Health Initiative Project and has found that API women are four times more likely than API men to contract HIV.

While there are various reasons for this figure–such as the fact that API women generally tend to become sexually active later in life than other women and some choose not to use condoms–one main concern is the “model minority” myth.  Hahm sees API women thinking that they’re “invincible” because of this idea of being the model minority in society, and this thinking can also be taken on by doctors.  API women, according to Hahm’s research in Massachusetts, are the least likely to get tested for HIV than women of all other races.  This may in part be due to the lack of encouragement from doctors and other healthcare workers.  More can be read here.

This issue is very prevalent today, especially in Oregon where healthcare that can cater to APIs is very few and far between.  Cultural sensitivity within healthcare facilities in Oregon is something APANO has advocated for, and is extremely important for the API community to stand behind.

For further information on HIV and API women, go to http://www.bu.edu/ssw/2011/02/16/faculty-study-works-to-identify-hiv-risk-behaviors-in-asian-american-women/ 

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Jillian Toda is an Oregonian from the Columbia River Gorge, where her great grandparents farmed upon arriving to America from Japan.   She is currently a student at Willamette University earning a B.A. in Rhetoric and Media Studies, with a minor in American Ethnic Studies, while also working toward an M.B.A. at Atkinson Graduate School of Management in Salem, OR.   New to blogging, Jillian’s personal blog can be found at http://reality-plus-me.blogspot.com/

Asian American Justice Center presents Youth Empowerment Fund

Calling all APIA youth who are active in projects focused on serving the APIA community!  The Asian American Justice Center’s Youth Advisory Council is offering grants up to $500 through their Youth Empowerment Fund.

If you’re interested, you can download the application here: http://www.divshare.com/download/15456826-cd7  For more information on the Youth Advisory Council, visit their facebook page.

Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis and should be submitted at least two months before the funding is needed so that there will be enough time to review your submission.   It sounds like a great opportunity–time to start thinking up some great projects and programs!

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Jillian Toda is a native Oregonian from the Columbia River Gorge, where her great grandparents farmed upon arriving to America from Japan.   She is currently a student at Willamette University earning a B.A. in Rhetoric and Media Studies, with a minor in American Ethnic Studies.  She is also working toward an M.B.A. at Atkinson Graduate School of Management in Salem, OR.   New to blogging, Jillian’s personal blog can be found at http://reality-plus-me.blogspot.com/